Aries Cheung
Toronto based visual artist

2004.

A generic portrayal of brotherly and sisterly love, these "Portraits" are twin faces of men and women who intertwine themselves into webs of woven heads and limbs. Both affectionate and aloof, they are all connected and at the same time keeping a distance from one another. All emotionless and absorbed in the interplay of affection and caution, desire and longing.

2005

The Twins series explore love and relationship through repeated images of human figures. This series of paintings are gateways connecting two parallel but opposite worlds existing on either side of the looking glass, where the dualities of human nature meet. The viewers are left to determine which is the darker self, and to sort out the good from the bad, the real from the surreal, and the light from the shadow. All the images from this series are based on famous and infamous archive photo images which have, one way or the other, created controversy in the course of history.

2006

Photographing Fairies series explore how the single male (nude) figures stand up to the gazers' scrutiny as sexual beings and objects of sexual desire in the absence of explicit sexual acts. The title is borrowed from a novel of the same title. The novel is about the fascination of capturing the images of fairies by photographs in the late Victorian and the turn of the century. The fairies in these photographs so produced in the intention as to prove the existence of fairies often turned out as nothing but some conspicuous, ambiguous, blurry specks of lights and shadows. As a technical process, Aries digitally manipulates photo images of male figures and uses the abstracted result as the basis for his paintings.

2008

Plant Series subtly deal with environmental issues that concern humans. The central theme is a hybridization or "cross breed" between human and plant, an intuitive reaction towards pollutions, global warming, diminishing natural resources and most important of all, the constant love and hate and power dynamic between human and nature. The result is a fantastical or sci-fi portrayal of whimsical, surreal creatures that look both awkward and at ease with their own existence and identity. Somehow, from within their grotesque appearance, there comes a voice that speaks hope, beauty and resilience.

2008

Salt Fish Girl 1: Hope & Forgetfulness
In October 2008, Toronto, I collaborated with choreographer/dancer, Emily Cheung and playwright/poet/performing artist, Gein Wong in Salt Fish Girl 1: Hope & Forgetfulness, a theatre adaptation of Canadian novel Salt Fish Girl by Larissa Lai. For the production, I created a series of multi-screen video projections which integrated with live theatre, dance, motion-sensing audio/visual technology. I also performed as an actor and dancer on stage, along with Emily, Gein, and Brigitte Tsang, interacting with spoken words, music, sound and videos.

2010

Hiding Words for You
Written by Gein Wong, this multi-media theatre production takes on the theme of Nushu, an ancient secret language created by women in ancient China. The story is about several women from different centuries re-connect with each other across time and space. I created sequences of video projections that interacted with actors and dancers on stage.

 

 

 

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Dance movements interacting with video projections    
         
       
Digital animation for video projection in HIding Words for You